35 BEST Succulents To Pair Together (35 Pairs)

David R Grant Jan 23, 2023
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succulents

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If you’re looking to create a beautiful and unique succulent garden, pairing the best succulents together is key.


Succulents come in all shapes, sizes and colors, so it can be difficult to decide which ones will look best when combined into one display.


Luckily, I’ve compiled this list of 35 best succulents to pair together for an easy way to create your own stunning succulent garden!


With everything from low-maintenance plants that require minimal care, to eye-catching varieties with colorful blooms and striking foliage, there’s something here for everyone.


Read on for our top picks and get ready to transform your outdoor space into a botanical wonderland!


What Are The Rules Of Mixing Succulents Together?


Below list with comprehensive description of 35 best pairs of succulents for you but first some general rules to achieve the best results mixining these type of plants.


Mixing succulents together can be a great way to create beautiful living art for your home or garden.


The best way to pair succulents is to choose a combination that best compliments each other.


Whether you opt for contrasting colors and shapes, or complementary ones, there are certain rules of thumb to ensure your succulent pairings will thrive.


1. Unify The Color Palette:


One way to create harmony when pairing succulents together is to unify the color palette.

If you’re pairing plants with bold shades of blue and green, try choosing succulents within the same color family so they don’t clash in their environment.

For a more subtle effect, choose white and grey-toned varieties like Echeveria ‘Silver Spoons' and Sedum 'Ice Plant'.


2. Contrast Forms:


You can create a great visual interest by pairing succulents with contrasting forms.

Try combining Echeveria ‘Blue Rose’ and curly-leafed Senecio rowleyanus, or the spiky Aloe polyphylla with Sempervivum tectorum to create a dramatic juxtaposition of textures.


3. Group By Size:


Think about grouping succulents by size when you're creating your arrangement as this will help to create a harmonious design overall.

Consider planting large varieties such as Haworthia cymbiformis near the back for a strong foundation, then add in smaller species like Aeonium haworthii and Sedeveria canteauchii towards the front for balance and depth.


4. Create A Focal Point:


When pairing succulents, it’s best to create a focal point.

This could be achieved by selecting an eye-catching variety such as the rosette-forming Kalanchoe gastonis-bonnieri or a cluster of bold Gasteraloe ‘Green Ice’.

Place these bolder plants in the center or front to draw attention away from any less showy specimens that you may have included in your arrangement.


5. Balance The Varieties:


A successful arrangement will combine both focal points and filler plants for balance – think about which varieties best fit each role within your design.

Filler plants like Senecio mandraliscae are great for adding texture to your design and provide a great backdrop for more showy varieties like Aeonium arboreum ‘Zwartkop’.


By following these simple rules, you can create beautiful succulent arrangements that will not only look striking in your home or garden but also be low-maintenance and easy to care for.


With so many fabulous varieties available, the possibilities are truly endless!


And so the best 35 pairings go as follows (additionally as a special bonus for you there are at the end of this post most frequently asked questions and answers):


1. Sedum and Aeonium:


Sedum is best known for its evergreen turf-forming foliage, while Aeonium are usually single rosettes that come in a range of colors from green to purple.


When planted together, the two succulents create an eye-catching contrast with their different shapes and sizes.


2. Haworthia and Aloe Vera:


Both of these succulents have thick leaves which makes them ideal for creating a lush, textured look without overcrowding your garden or potting project.


Haworthias have beautiful zebra patterned stripes along their leaves, complimenting the boldness of Aloe Vera’s waxy skinned leaves best when placed side by side or near one another in containers or gardenscapes alike!


3. Agave Tequilana and Echeveria Purpusorum:


An interesting pairing combination that adds texture to any landscape with these unique plants! The tequila agaves sharp thorns offer protection while providing interest.


While the echeveria purpusorum has soft pastel pink hues with rounded edges adding a touch of femininity to this mix best suited for larger planters rather than traditional plantings settings because they can’t be crowded together.


4. Echeveria Pulvinata and Graptopetalum Parasum:


This duo combination is best suited for succulent gardens or potting projects where the two plants can be kept separate as they have different needs to ensure best growth!


The echeveria pulvinata with its soft grey-green leaves and pinkish tips, easily stands out against the silvery blue foliage of the graptopetalum parasum, creating a beautiful contrast that’s sure to draw attention.


5. Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora and Sedeveria Hybrid:


Kalanchoe thyrsiflora bright, long-lasting blooms are best paired with sedeveria hybrids, which are known for their bright foliage.


When planted in the same pot or garden bed, these succulents will create a stunning display of colorful flowers and foliage that’s sure to make jaws drop.


6. Agave Sisalana and Echeveria Hybida:


For a modern feel, pair agave sisalana striking architectural form with echeveria hybrida's soft edges!

The blue-green foliage of the agave is best complemented by the pinkish hues of the echeveria making this pairing best suited for more formal landscapes.


7. Crassula Ovata and Senecio Radicans:


This evergreen pair is best suited for succulent planters or rock gardens, as the crassula ovata thick foliage and senecio radicans' trailing stems create a unique contrast best seen from above!


8. Sedum Acre and Graptopetalum Paraguayense:


This low-maintenance duo combination best suited for small spaces or containers offers an abundance of colors and textures!


The sedum acre boasts bright yellow blooms that pop against the purplish-blue foliage of the graptopetalum paraguayense making it best to be kept together in one place so you can enjoy their full beauty.


9. Crassula Ovata Jade Plant and Sempervivium:


This tough pairing combination is best suited for outdoor succulent gardens with both the crassula ovata jade-like foliage and the sempervivums rosettes offering a unique texture best seen when planted together.


10. Moonstones and Echeveria Setosa:


These two succulent varieties are best paired for planters or rock gardens offering an interesting mix of colors and shapes!

The moonstone's silvery blue foliage is best contrasted with the echeveria setosa fine, delicate leaves that come in a range of hues from green to pink making it a must-have pairing.


11. Asclepias Curassavica and Kalanchoe Tiltanicola:


Perfectly suited for outdoor garden beds, this duo combination creates an eye-catching contrast between its bold colors and soft textures best seen when planted together!

The orange blooms of the asclepias curassavica stand out against kalanchoe tiltanicola's bright purple foliage creating stunning visual appeal.


12. Euphorbia Tirucalli Firesticks and Crassula Capitella Campfire Plant:


This fiery duo offers unique color, texture, and shape best viewed from afar! Both plants can be kept separate but look best when side by side in larger containers or garden beds due to their different needs.

However they create quite the wow factor when placed together thanks to the euphorbia tirucalli firesticks.


13. Echeveria Agavoides and Aeonium Arboreum:


This best suited for large planters or succulent gardens, this pairing of echeveria agavoides low-maintenance foliage and aeonium arboreum stunning rosettes make it an ideal duo combination!

The variegated greens and purples of the echeveria offer a natural contrast to the bright yellow flowers that bloom atop the stems of the aeonium creating a beautiful effect best seen when grown together.


14. Senecio Haworthii Angel Wings and Graptopetalum Superbum:


Suited best for garden beds or small containers, this duo creates an interesting visual appeal best viewed from above!


The trailing angel wings of senecio haworthii combine with the unique dusty blue foliage of graptopetalum superbum to create soft texture that’s sure to draw attention in any setting.

15. Sedeveria Cheyenne Jewel and Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana Calandiva:


Perfectly suited for both indoor and outdoor settings, this pairing is best kept separate due to their different needs but can create quite the wow factor when placed side by side!


The sedeveria cheyenne jewel offers bright yellow flower clusters that best contrast against the kalanchoe blossfeldiana calandiva's lush green foliage creating an eye-catching effect.

16. Graptopetalum Superbum and Sedum Rubrotinctum:


This best suited for rock gardens or small containers, this duo offers an interesting contrast between its hues best seen when planted together!


The bright purple foliage of the graptopetalum superbum stands out against the fiery red leaves of the sedum rubrotinctum creating a unique visual effect.

17. Senecio Radicans and Echeveria Subsessilis:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or planters, this pair can best be seen from above thanks to their different heights!


The trailing stems of senecio radicans create soft texture that contrasts with echeveria subsessilis rounded rosettes making it an ideal combination to enjoy up close.

18. Crassula Capitella Campfire Plant and Kalanchoe Manginii:


Best kept side by side in medium-sized containers, this duo creates a vibrant contrast best enjoyed from afar!


The crassula capitella campfire plant orange, yellow, pink flowers pop against the kalanchoe manginii velvety green foliage creating quite an eye-catching effect.

19. Graptoveria Debbie and Echeveria Setosa:


Perfectly suited for outdoor gardens or larger containers, this best seen from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The deep purple leaves of the graptoveria debbie stand out against the echeveria setosa fine, delicate leaves that come in a range of hues from green to pink making it a must-have pairing.


20. Sedum Nussbaumerianum and Agave Attenuata:


Best viewed side by side in large planters for succulent gardens, this combination makes for quite the statement best seen when planted together!


The sprawling stems of sedum nussbaumerianum contrast with agave attenuata bold blue foliage creating soft texture and interesting shape that are sure to draw attention in any setting.

21. Euphorbia Tirucalli Firesticks and Mammillaria Elongata:


Perfect for both indoor and outdoor containers, this best viewed from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The fiery red stems of the euphorbia tirucalli firesticks are sure to stand out against the mammillaria elongata's bright yellow flowers creating a vibrant contrast that can be best appreciated from afar.

22. Aeonium Sunburst and Echeveria Imbricata:


Best kept together in small planters or succulent gardens, this duo provides interesting texture best seen when planted side by side!


The deep green leaves of the aeonium sunburst offer contrast with echeveria imbricata's blue-green hues, making it an ideal pairing for any setting.

23. Sedum Morganianum Burrito Plant and Graptopetalum Paraguayense Ghost Plant:


Perfect for outdoor succulent gardens or larger containers, this combination makes quite the statement best seen when placed closely together!


The trailing stems of sedum morganianum burrito plant combined with the silvery ghostly foliage of graptopetalum paraguayense create an interesting display best enjoyed from afar.


24. Echeveria Pulvinata and Sempervivum Tectorum:


Best kept in smaller containers, this best seen from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The soft pinkish hues of echeveria pulvinata contrast with sempervivum tectorum deep purple leaves making for quite the statement when placed side by side.

25. Crassula Ovata Gollum and Sedeveria Black Prince:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or planters, this duo can best be seen from above thanks to their different heights!


The bright green tips of crassula ovata gollum stand out against sedeverlia black prince's deep burgundy foliage creating quite an interesting visual effect.


26. Aloe Polyphylla and Senecio Serpens:


Best kept together in large planters or succulent gardens, this combination offers a unique contrast best seen when planted together!


The spiky leaves of aloe polyphylla create texture that stands out against senecio serpens lush blue-green foliage perfect for any indoor or outdoor setting looking to add some color and interest.


27. Aeonium Sunburst and Sedum Nussbaumerianum:


Perfect for both indoor and outdoor containers, this best seen from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The sprawling stems of sedum nussbaumerianum contrast with the deep green leaves of the aeonium sunburst creating quite the statement when placed closely together.


28. Kalanchoe Manginii and Echeveria Imbricata:


Best kept in small planters or succulent gardens, this duo is best appreciated when viewed side by side!


The velvety green foliage of kalanchoe manginii contrasts with echeveria imbricata's blue-green hues, making it an ideal pairing that can bring life to any setting.


29. Crassula Ovata Gollum and Senecio Serpens:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or larger containers, this combination can best be seen from above thanks to their different heights!


The bright green tips of crassula ovata gollum stand out against senecio serpens' lush blue-green foliage creating quite an interesting visual effect that will make


30. Sedum Morganianum Burrito Plant and Echeveria Imbricata:


Best kept together in small planters or succulent gardens, this best viewed from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The trailing stems of the sedum morganianum burrito plant contrast with echeveria imbricata's blue-green hues making for quite the statement when placed side by side.


31. Aloe Polyphylla and Kalanchoe Manginii:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or larger containers, this combination offers interesting texture best seen when planted closely together!


The spiky leaves of aloe polyphylla provide visual interest that stands out against kalanchoe manginii's velvety green foliage perfect for any setting looking to add some color and interest.


32. Senecio Serpens and Sedeveria Black Prince:


Best kept in smaller containers, this duo can best be seen from above thanks to their different heights!


The lush blue-green foliage of senecio serpens contrasts with sedeverlia black prince's deep burgundy leaves creating quite a stunning effect when placed closely together.


33. Graptopetalum Paraguayense and Echeveria Pulvinata:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or planters, this best seen from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The soft pinkish hues of echeveria pulvinata contrast with graptopetalum paraguayense's grey-green leaves making for quite the statement when placed side by side.


34. Crassula Ovata Gollum and Sedeveria Jet Beads:


Best kept together in small planters or succulent gardens, this combination offers a unique contrast best seen when planted together!


The bright green tips of crassula ovata gollum stand out against sedeverlia jet beads' deep burgundy foliage creating quite an interesting visual effect that will make any setting pop.


35. Sempervivum Tectorum and Kalanchoe Manginii:


Perfectly suited for outdoor succulent gardens or larger containers, this best viewed from a distance as its unique foliage creates an eye-catching display best enjoyed up close!


The vibrant purple rosettes of sempervivium tectorum contrast with kalanchoe manginii's velvety green foliage making for quite the statement when placed side by side.


So there you have it!


35 best succulent pairings to create a stunning array of colors and textures best enjoyed in any setting.


Remember, while some of these pairs can be kept separate, they look best when grown together so why not give them a try?


You won’t be sorry! Good luck on your succulent journey and happy planting!


And as a free bonus for you I have preapred most frequent questions and answers below.


Your Question: Can Succulents be together?


The answer to this question is a resounding yes!


Succulents can and do thrive when planted together. When succulents are cultivated in the same soil, they can form an intricate yet beautiful landscape with various colors, shapes, and textures.


When several succulents are grouped together it allows for improved water drainage, better air circulation, and more room for growth.


Additionally, by grouping different species of succulents you can increase their ability to resist disease and pests as well as provide a greater variety of nutrients for healthy plants.


Furthermore, pairing certain varieties of succulents together can add visual interest to your garden or home decor.


For instance, if you pair a low-growing succulent like Sansevieria trifasciata 'Hahnii' with the tall Agave attenuata 'Frosty Blue', you'll create an eye-catching contrast that will draw attention to your space.


Additionally, pairing two similar looking succulents such as two Haworthias or two Euphorbia obesa's creates a stunningly uniform and symmetrical display that visitors won't be able to ignore.


Finally, when selecting best succulents to pair together it's important to pay attention to their light requirements as well as their water needs.


For example, if you plant two varieties with very different light requirements side by side — one that requires full sun and another that prefers shade — the one requiring more sunlight could become stressed from the lack of adequate light and suffer health issues due to over watering because it doesn't require as much water as its counterpart.


On the other hand, if you choose two varieties that have similar light needs but very different water requirements – one requiring little water while the other needing more frequent hydration – then one may suffer from dehydration while the other could become overly saturated which may lead to root rot or fungal infection.


In conclusion, suculents are excellent companions for each other when chosen wisely using consideration of both light and water requirements along with aesthetics in mind.


With careful selection you can achieve stunning displays with a variety of colors and textures while also ensuring an optimal environment where each individual plant is able to thrive without undue stress on either species

Your Question: What Are 10 Most Common Mistakes With Planting Succulents?


1. Not Providing Enough Light:


One of the most common mistake with planting succulents is not providing enough light.


Most succulents need at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight per day to thrive and grow healthy, otherwise they may become leggy or etiolated.


A lack of sunlight can also cause plants to produce fewer or no flowers, as well as slower growth.


It’s best to choose an area that receives plenty of natural light, such as a bright corner window in your home or balcony, for best results.


2. Overwatering:


Another common mistake with planting succulents is overwatering them.

Succulents are best suited for a “soak and dry” watering schedule; this means allowing the soil to dry out completely before thoroughly soaking it once again.


This method allows for air pockets between the soil particles and prevents waterlogging, which can lead to root rot and other issues.


Monitor your soil’s moisture levels frequently so you can adjust accordingly; if the soil feels damp or moist to the touch, hold off on watering until it has had time to dry out completely.


3. Unsuitable Container:


If you're planting succulents in containers, an unsuitable container could be one of the biggest mistakes you make when growing them -- especially if they’re planted in a pot that doesn't have any drainage holes.

Allowing water to sit in plant pots will inevitably result in root rot due to overwatering.


It’s best practice to use containers (and soils) that are specifically designed for succulent plants when possible since these usually contain added components such as gravel/pebbles which promote better drainage and ventilation around the roots.


4. Poor Soil Quality:


Substandard soil quality is another common mistake when growing succulents since having poor quality soil can lead to inadequate nutrient intake, stunted growth, unhealthy foliage coloration, and more.


Aim for a mix that contains high amounts of organic matter (such as peat moss) along with sand/gravel or other porous materials like bark chips or lava rocks.


This will ensure best results in terms of both aeration and drainage while providing nutrients essential for healthy growth over time as it gradually decomposes within the substrate material itself.


5. Planting Too Deeply:


Planting your succulents too deeply into their potting mix can quickly lead to problems such as stem/root rot due to excessive moisture buildup around their roots – leading them vulnerable towards fungal infections over time if left unchecked.


Make sure always check that all plants are planted at their recommended depths before transplanting into new substrates - generally speaking most require only shallow planting depths (no deeper than 1-2 inches), so try not go too deep when planting!


6. Reusing Old Soil:


Reusing old soil from previous pots might seem tempting but this can spell disaster for your newly-transplanted succulents.


Old soil tends to retain excess moisture which could cause root rot if there isn’t proper drainage available – leading you back down a path full of potential problems like fungal infections and other issues caused by overwatering later on down the line…

Best practice would be always use fresh potting mixes whenever possible whenever repotting your plants!


7. Not Testing pH Levels:


Although many commonly grown species prefer slightly acidic soils below 7 pH range (which indicates alkaline conditions), some others may require higher acidity levels or neutral soils (around 6pH) depending on where they come from originally.

Failing test those pH levels beforehand could potentially lead towards various nutrient deficiencies later on down the line.


Therefore its best practice would be conduct regular testing sessions throughout each season using a reliable pH meter device, so you can quickly adjust necessary amendments according based off of test results without issue!


8. Over Fertilizing:


Plants naturally need certain levels of nutrients present within their substrate material order grow successfully.

However too much fertilizer can actually burn away delicate roots systems due over saturation – thus causing significant damage down road if left unchecked !


Its best practice use fertilizers sparingly only when they absolutely necessary, perhaps lightly misted onto foliage during summer periods harvest more blooms during flowering seasons instead …


9. Over Pruning:


Cutting away dead leaves parts stalks help promote healthier growth patterns overall, however its important remember too much pruning expose vey sensitive tissue open elements such rain / wind etc …


Therefore its best exercise caution when removing any outer layers at all times order prevent further damage occurring afterwards !


10. Not Paying Attention To Flower Coloration:


Lastly one major mistakes beginners often make neglect consider flower colors plantings should pair together

Certain shades white / red / yellow etc signify different types traits within species, therefore always keep eye out next time shopping order find best combinations round out garden - specifically aim contrast


The most common mistakes people make when planting succulents are: watering too frequently, choosing the wrong soil and failing to provide adequate light.


Watering succulents too often can cause them to rot, while not watering them enough can cause their roots to dry out and die.


It is best to water succulents deeply once a week during the growing season, and less often during the dormant season.


When selecting soil for your succulent, make sure it is well-draining and contains organic matter like compost or peat moss.


Succulents require a lot of light to thrive, so make sure to choose an area with direct sunlight for best results.


In addition, proper fertilization is important for keeping your succulents healthy.

Fertilizers should be used sparingly—typically once every two weeks—to avoid burning the plant’s delicate root system.


If you’re looking for a natural fertilizer option, consider using fish emulsion or liquid seaweed extract topically on the soil surface every few months.


Planting in overly large containers can also be detrimental to your succulents’ health as they won’t have enough soil mixed with sand/gravel close enough to their roots to absorb any water that may develop in these bigger pots.


So make sure you choose appropriately sized containers; no more than three times wider than the widest point of your succulent’s roots.


The best way to ensure success with planting succulents is by doing research on each variety before you purchase it and begin planting it in your garden or container potting mix.


Different species of succulent have varied requirements when it comes to temperature, light intensity, humidity levels, etc.

So make sure you understand exactly what conditions must be met for each type of succulent will help prevent some common mistakes from occurring down the road.


Finally, pairing compatible plants together helps create a visually appealing display that’s easier to manage overall due to similar watering needs of those plants being grouped together.


Succulents don't all have similar needs but choosing varieties that share similar ones will help reduce stress on both plants and increase their chances for survival long-term if managed properly.


For example, pairing cacti with other drought-tolerant varieties that require full sun would work quite well since they would all thrive under similar conditions given plenty of light and minimal water requirements throughout the year.


Your Question: Is It The Same To Care For All Succulents?


No, not all succulents require the same care. Succulents are a diverse family of plants with many different types and varieties.


While some species will thrive with minimal care, others may need more attention and maintenance to remain healthy.


Sunlight, water, soil type, temperature, and humidity are all important factors to consider when caring for succulents.


When it comes to sunlight, most succulents prefer bright indirect light or full sun exposure.

However, certain species such as Echeveria can tolerate less intense light levels while other varieties such as Sempervivum need more direct sunlight.


Be sure to check the light requirements of your specific plant before determining a placement in your home or garden.


Watering is another important factor when caring for succulents.

Many species do best with infrequent watering; they should only be watered once their soil is completely dry and never allow them to sit in standing water.


Over-watering can cause root rot and kill the plant so it’s best to err on the side of caution and only provide limited amounts of water.


Additionally, different species may require various levels of humidity which can affect how often you need to water them.

Those that prefer higher amounts of humidity should be watered more frequently than those that prefer drier conditions.


The best soil for succulents should be well-draining and contain peat moss or coarse sand for improved aeration and drainage.


Providing an adequate soil mix helps ensure that excess water is able to drain away from the plant’s roots quickly which helps keep them healthy and prevents root rot from occurring due to over-watering.


Specialized cactus and succulent soil mixes are available if you have difficulty finding something suitable at your local garden center.


Finally, temperature also plays an important role in caring for succulents; most prefer temperatures between 50-90°F (10-32°C).


Extreme heat or cold can cause damage so it’s best to avoid placing them near heating units or windowsills where extreme temperatures fluctuations could occur throughout the day or night.


Checking your plant’s environment regularly will help you make any adjustments needed when necessary to ensure it remains happy and healthy over time.


All in all, caring for different types of succulents requires a bit of knowledge due to the wide range of environmental requirements they may have depending on their species or variety so it pays off...


... taking some time to research each one individually prior making any decisions about their placement in your home or garden space!



Your Question: Can Succulents Multiply On Their Own?


Succulents are a popular choice when it comes to houseplants. They come in an array of shapes, sizes, and colors, and best of all they're relatively easy to care for.


But one question that often pops up is: do succulents multiply on their own?

The answer is yes!

Succulents can indeed multiply on their own with the right conditions.


Most succulents have the ability to produce offsets or "pups" – small clones of the original plant that grow around its base.

These pups are created when the parent plant becomes root-bound and sends out energy producing new growth at the base.


When these pups become big enough, they will begin to branch off from their parent plant, growing into a whole new plant with its own set of roots – this is how succulents reproduce!


The conditions for successfully multiplying succulents largely depend on what type of succulent you have.

For example, some varieties like aloe vera and snake plants need more direct sunlight than other types while many cacti prefer partial shade.


In general, however, most succulents require soil that drains well and ample amounts of sunlight in order to thrive.


It's also important to make sure your succulent doesn't get too crowded. If the original plant takes up too much space or has too many pups around it then there won't be much room for any new ones to develop properly.


You can help avoid this by regularly trimming off any excess foliage or replanting overcrowded plants in larger containers with more soil depth.


All in all, propagating succulents can be a fun and rewarding process but just make sure you don't overdo it – if you follow proper care instructions then your little garden will flourish!


Your Question: What Are The Easiest Succulents To Grow?

1. Aloe Vera:


One of the most popular succulent plants, Aloe Vera is easy to grow and maintain. It's best suited for sunny spots with well-drained soil, and can also be grown in pots indoors or outdoors.


Aloe Vera is great for a variety of climates, and its long leaves are filled with moisture that helps it thrive in dry conditions.


The best part about Aloe Vera is that it's very low-maintenance; requiring little attention and water, meaning you don't have to worry about overwatering or underwatering it.


2. Sedum Rubrotinctum (Jelly Bean Plant):


This cute succulent grows in an array of colors including red, pink, green, white, yellow and more! Its small size means it can fit easily in any space - especially when kept in a pot.


It prefers indirect but bright light and should only be watered when the soil has fully dried out; otherwise its plump jelly bean-shaped leaves may become soggy or prone to rot.


3. Echeveria ‘Lola’:


Also known as ‘Lola’s Blush’ or ‘Mexican Snowball’, this beautiful echeveria features rosettes of tight green foliage covered with soft blush pink tips - creating an eye-catching display!


One of the best things about this succulent is that it can handle full sun exposure without burning easily.


However if you live somewhere hot you may want to give your plant some afternoon shade during the hottest months of summer.


Water only when the soil feels dry to touch - if left too wet for too long Lola’s Blush will start to rot from the roots up!


4. Crassula Ovata (Jade Plant):


A classic amongst succulent enthusiasts, jade plants are renowned for their glossy green fleshy leaves and woody stems which create an attractive miniature tree-like appearance over time.


They require bright direct sunlight but can manage a few hours of bright indirect light each day too; make sure they are given enough airflow around them as they like to breathe freely rather than be crowded together in small spaces!


Water only once a week but not too deeply - make sure your jade plant isn't sitting in excess water as this will lead to root rot over time.


5. Kalanchoe Thyrsiflora (Paddle Plant):


If you're looking for something a little different then this paddle plant could be just what you need!

With its unique shape reminiscent of a duck's bill, Kalanchoe thyrsiflora stands out from other succulents with its silvery foliage tipped with deep purple edges - perfect for adding visual interest wherever you place it!


It does best when placed near a window where it can get plenty of indirect sunlight; water judiciously as overwatering could cause root rot due to its shallow root system - allow the soil to dry out between each watering session before adding more moisture again.


6. Graptopetalum Paraguayense (Ghost Plant):


For those who prefer something more subtle yet still interesting then try growing Ghost Plants! These delicate succulents feature silvery grey foliage which appears almost transparent at times – like ghostly figures hovering above your garden bed!


They do best in well drained soils so ensure your potting mix has plenty of organic matter included – such as peat moss or perlite – plus full sun exposure or even partial shade during hot summer days would work too!


Water sparingly as these beauties store moisture within their intricate foliage so err on the side of caution here if unsure how much water your Ghost Plant needs – better safe than sorry when it comes to overwatering any succulent species!


7. Senecio Radicans:


Also known as String Of Bananas due to their curved yellowish green leaves resembling mini banana fruits; this trailing perennial makes an excellent addition both indoors & outdoors alike!


It grows best if given bright indirect light though these babes can cope with slight shade quite well toojust remember not to overwater them as these Senecios tend not soak up excessive amounts & drown quickly if left sitting wet for too long periods at a time


best practice here would be err on the side of caution & step away from giving them any further moisture until they've visibly dried out slightly first before rehydrating them again next go round !

8. Haworthia Fasciata (Zebra Cactus):


A gorgeous ornamental houseplant suitable even for those beginner growers amongst us – these Haworthias thrive best under direct sunlight or near bright windowsills but also cope fine with partial shade making them ideal candidates even if outdoor conditions don't permit full sun exposure year round…


Water moderately once every 2 weeks max & always let their soils dry completely before rehydrating again otherwise root rot could occur if left too wet for too long - best practice here would be to err on the side of caution & step away from giving them any further moisture until they've visibly dried out slightly first before rehydrating them again next time round!

All in all, these are some of the best succulents you can pair together. Whether you’re an experienced gardener or a novice, these tips should help get your garden going in no time.


With careful watering and placement, you’ll have a unique and vibrant display that is sure to impress onlookers!


Just remember to provide plenty of airflow between plants and keep their soils dry until the next watering session to prevent any root rot issues - best practice here would be to err on the side of caution & step away from giving them any further moisture until they've visibly dried out slightly first before rehydrating them again next time round!


Good luck and happy growing!

Please note

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Never rely solely on digital information.

Taking into account your individual situation will help you make the best decisions for the wellbeing of your companion pet.

Cactus Lands site serves as an informative resource, but should never be used to diagnose or treat a medical condition of neither you nor your pet.

When it comes to health of your pet, always consult with a qualified veterinary medical professional for the best advice and care tailored specifically for you and your pet!

Cactus Lands site and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical, veterinarian or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such.

You should always consult with a qualified physician or veterinary health professional about your specific circumstances.



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