63 BEST Tips How to Behead a Succulent (Interesting)

David R Grant Jun 02, 2023
196 People Read
Behead a Succulent
Table of Contents
  1. How to Behead a Succulent: A Comprehensive Guide
    1. Step 1: Choose the Right Succulent
    2. Step 2: Gather Your Supplies
    3. Step 3: Prepare the Succulent
    4. Step 4: Make the Cut
    5. Step 5: Replant the Top Portion
    6. Step 6: Care for Your New Plants
  2. Tips for Success
  3. Common Mistakes to Avoid
  4. Propagating Succulents from Beheaded Stems
  5. Industry Opinion
  6. FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)
    1. Q: Can I behead any succulent?
    2. Q: When is the best time to behead a succulent?
    3. Q: What tools do I need to behead a succulent?
    4. Q: How do I know where to make the cut?
    5. Q: How do I make the cut?
    6. Q: Do I need to use rooting hormone when replanting the top portion?
    7. Q: How long should I let the top portion callus over before replanting?
    8. Q: What type of soil should I use to replant the top portion?
    9. Q: How much water should I give my newly replanted succulent?
    10. Q: How much sunlight does a beheaded succulent need?
    11. Q: Why is my beheaded succulent not growing new leaves?
    12. Q: Can I behead multiple stems at once?
    13. Q: How do I know if my succulent is healthy enough to behead?
    14. Q: How long does it take for a beheaded succulent to root?
    15. Q: How often should I fertilize my beheaded succulent?
    16. Q: Can I behead a succulent in the winter?
    17. Q: Can I propagate a beheaded succulent in water?
    18. Q: Can I use any type of pot or container to replant the top portion?
    19. Q: Can I behead an indoor succulent?
    20. Q: Can I behead a succulent that has a single stem?
    21. Q: How do I know if my succulent is getting too much or too little water?
    22. Q: How deep should I plant the top portion of the succulent?
    23. Q: Can I use sand instead of potting soil to replant the top portion?
    24. Q: Can I replant the top portion of the succulent in the same pot as the parent plant?
  7. Please note
  8. Conclusion

Disclosure: Some of the links in this article may be affiliate links, which can provide compensation to me at no cost to you if you decide to purchase. This site is not intended to provide financial advice and is for entertainment only. 

How to Behead a Succulent: A Comprehensive Guide

Beheading a succulent may sound like a cruel act, but it's actually a common practice in succulent care.


Beheading is the process of removing the top portion of a succulent and replanting it to encourage new growth.


This can be especially helpful if your succulent has become too tall and leggy, or if you want to propagate new plants from the parent.


In this guide, we'll provide step-by-step instructions for beheading a succulent and offer tips for success.


Step 1: Choose the Right Succulent

Not all succulents are suitable for beheading. Look for plants with a rosette shape or multiple stems coming from the base. Some good candidates include:

  • Echeveria

  • Graptopetalum

  • Sedum

  • Crassula

Avoid beheading succulents that have a single stem or grow too tall, such as Aloe vera or Agave.


Step 2: Gather Your Supplies

You'll need a few supplies before you begin the beheading process:

  • A sharp, clean knife or scissors

  • A clean work surface

  • Potting soil

  • A pot or container for the new plant

  • Optional: rooting hormone powder or liquid


Step 3: Prepare the Succulent

Before beheading your succulent, make sure it's healthy and well-watered. You don't want to stress the plant any further by beheading it when it's already struggling.


Next, identify where you want to make the cut. Look for a spot on the stem where there are several leaves and where the stem is at least 1 inch long. This will give you enough room to replant the top portion.


Step 4: Make the Cut

Using your sharp knife or scissors, make a clean cut through the stem of the succulent. Be sure to cut straight across, not at an angle, and avoid crushing or damaging the stem.


Once you've removed the top portion of the plant, set it aside on a clean surface to dry and callus over for several days. This will help prevent rot when you replant it.


Step 5: Replant the Top Portion

Once the top portion of the succulent has callused over, it's time to replant it. Fill a pot or container with potting soil and create a small hole in the center.


Dip the cut end of the top portion in rooting hormone powder or liquid (optional) and place it in the hole. Gently pack soil around the base of the stem to secure it in place.


Water the newly replanted succulent lightly and then wait several days before watering again. This will give the plant time to adjust and begin rooting in its new soil.


Step 6: Care for Your New Plants

Both the beheaded succulent and the newly replanted top portion will need proper care to thrive:

  • Water sparingly: Succulents prefer dry soil, so make sure to let the soil dry out completely between waterings.

  • Provide plenty of sunlight: Most succulents need bright, direct sunlight to grow properly.

  • Fertilize occasionally: You can fertilize your succulents with a balanced fertilizer every few months during the growing season.


Tips for Success

Beheading a succulent can be a bit intimidating, but with the right preparation and care, your plants will thrive. Here are some additional tips for success:

  • Use a sharp, clean knife or scissors to ensure a clean cut and prevent damage to the plant.

  • Water your succulent before beheading to reduce stress on the plant.

  • Let the top portion of the succulent callus over for several days before replanting to prevent rot.

  • Consider using rooting hormone powder or liquid to encourage faster rooting.

  • Avoid overwatering your newly replanted succulent, as this can cause root rot.

  • Keep your succulent in bright, direct sunlight for optimal growth.


By following these tips and taking good care of your newly beheaded succulent and the newly replanted top portion, you'll be rewarded with healthy, thriving plants.


Common Mistakes to Avoid

Beheading a succulent is a straightforward process, but there are some common mistakes to avoid:

  • Cutting too high or too low: Make sure to cut the stem in the right spot – not too high and not too low. If you cut too high, there won't be enough stem for the top portion to root properly. And if you cut too low, the parent plant may not recover.

  • Leaving too few leaves: When replanting the top portion of the succulent, make sure to leave enough leaves above the soil line. If you bury too many leaves, they can rot or become diseased.

  • Watering too much: Succulents prefer dry soil, so avoid overwatering your newly replanted succulent. Too much water can cause the roots to rot, which can kill the plant.

  • Using the wrong soil: Succulents need well-draining soil that allows excess water to drain away quickly. Avoid using heavy soils that retain moisture, as this can also lead to root rot.

  • Placing the plants in direct sunlight too soon: Newly replanted succulents need time to adjust to their new environment. Avoid placing them in direct sunlight too soon, as this can cause sunburn and stress the plant.


Propagating Succulents from Beheaded Stems

One of the benefits of beheading a succulent is that you can propagate new plants from the top portion. Once the top portion has rooted and begun producing new growth, you can separate it from the parent plant and replant it in its own container.


To propagate a succulent from a beheaded stem, follow these steps:


1. Allow the top portion to root for several weeks, until it has established a strong root system.


2. Gently remove the new plant from the soil, taking care not to damage the roots.


3. Separate any small offsets or baby plants that have formed at the base of the rosette or stem.


4. Replant the new plants in their own containers, using well-draining potting soil.


5. Water sparingly and provide bright, indirect sunlight.

With proper care and attention, your newly propagated succulent plants will continue to grow and thrive.


Industry Opinion

Beheading a succulent may seem daunting at first, but with the right preparation and care, it's a simple way to keep your plants healthy and promote new growth. Remember to choose the right succulent, gather your supplies, make a clean cut, replant the top portion in well-draining soil, and water sparingly. With patience and care, you'll soon have healthy, thriving succulents to enjoy.


And if you're feeling particularly adventurous, you can even experiment with different ways to behead your succulents, such as cutting the stem at an angle or beheading multiple stems at once. Just remember to take things slow, go at your own pace, and enjoy the process of caring for your beautiful succulent plants!


FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)


Q: Can I behead any succulent?

A: No, not all succulents are suitable for beheading. Look for plants with a rosette shape or multiple stems coming from the base.


Q: When is the best time to behead a succulent?

A: The best time to behead a succulent is during its active growing season, which is typically in spring or summer.


Q: What tools do I need to behead a succulent?

A: You'll need a sharp, sterilized knife or pair of scissors, a clean work surface, and a container or soil mix to propagate the beheaded plant.


Q: How do I know where to make the cut?

A: Look for a spot on the stem where there are several leaves and where the stem is at least 1 inch long.


Q: How do I make the cut?

A: Using your sharp knife or scissors, make a clean cut through the stem of the succulent. Be sure to cut straight across, not at an angle, and avoid crushing or damaging the stem.


Q: Do I need to use rooting hormone when replanting the top portion?

A: It's optional, but rooting hormone can help encourage faster rooting.


Q: How long should I let the top portion callus over before replanting?

A: Let the top portion callus over for several days before replanting to prevent rot.


Q: What type of soil should I use to replant the top portion?

A: Use a well-draining potting soil that allows excess water to drain away quickly.


Q: How much water should I give my newly replanted succulent?

A: Water sparingly and allow the soil to dry out completely between waterings.


Q: How much sunlight does a beheaded succulent need?

A: Most succulents need bright, direct sunlight to grow properly.


Q: Why is my beheaded succulent not growing new leaves?

A: It may take several weeks for the beheaded plant to start producing new growth. Be patient and make sure the plant is getting enough sunlight and water.


Q: Can I behead multiple stems at once?

A: Yes, you can behead multiple stems at once if you want to propagate more than one plant.


Q: How do I know if my succulent is healthy enough to behead?

A: Make sure your succulent is well-watered and in good health before beheading it.


Q: How long does it take for a beheaded succulent to root?

A: It can take several weeks for the top portion of the succulent to root properly.


Q: How often should I fertilize my beheaded succulent?

A: You can fertilize your succulent with a balanced fertilizer every few months during the growing season.


Q: Can I behead a succulent in the winter?

A: It's not recommended to behead a succulent in the winter, as they are typically dormant during this time.


Q: Can I propagate a beheaded succulent in water?

A: No, it's best to replant the top portion in soil to encourage proper rooting.


Q: Can I use any type of pot or container to replant the top portion?

A: Use a pot or container that has drainage holes to prevent excess water from accumulating around the roots.


Q: Can I behead an indoor succulent?

A: Yes, you can behead indoor succulents as long as they are in good health.


Q: Can I behead a succulent that has a single stem?

A: It's not recommended to behead succulents with a single stem, as they may not recover.


Q: How do I know if my succulent is getting too much or too little water?

A: Too much water can cause the roots to rot, while too little water can cause the plant to wilt and dry out. Make sure to water sparingly and let the soil dry out completely between waterings.


Q: How deep should I plant the top portion of the succulent?

A: Plant the top portion of the succulent so that the base of the stem is level with the soil surface.


Q: Can I use sand instead of potting soil to replant the top portion?

A: Sand doesn't have enough nutrients to support succulent growth. Use a well-draining potting soil instead.


Q: Can I replant the top portion of the succulent in the same pot as the parent plant?

A: It's not recommended to replant the top portion in the same pot as the parent plant, as this can lead to overcrowding and root competition.


Please note

This https://cactuslands.com/ website (the “Blog”) is published and provided for informational and entertainment purposes only. 


The information in the Blog constitutes the content creator’s own opinions (and any guest bloggers posting from time to time) and it should not be regarded as a description of any services provided by any company. 


When it comes to matters of health, always consult with a trained medical professional – never rely solely on digital information. Taking into account your individual situation will help you make the best decisions for your own wellbeing. 


The Blog serves as an informative resource, but should never be used to diagnose or treat a medical condition. When it comes to your health, always consult with a qualified doctor for the best advice and care tailored specifically for you!

 

The Blog and the materials and information it contains are not intended to, and do not constitute, medical or other health advice or diagnosis and should not be used as such. You should always consult with a qualified physician or health professional about your specific circumstances.


Also the opinions expressed in the Blog are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual or on any specific security or investment product or loan, loans, credit, insurance or any other financial product or transaction. It is only intended to provide education about the financial industry. The views reflected in the commentary are subject to change at any time without notice.


Nothing on this Blog constitutes investment advice, performance data or any recommendation that any security, portfolio of securities, investment product, transaction or investment strategy, loan, loans, credit, insurance or any other financial instrument or transaction is suitable for any specific person.  


From reading this Blog we cannot assess anything about your personal circumstances, your finances, or your goals and objectives, all of which are unique to you, so any opinions or information contained on this Blog are just that – an opinion or information.  


You should not use this Blog to make financial decisions and we highly recommend you seek professional advice from someone who is authorized to provide investment advice.


Any indices referenced for comparison are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly.  Investments in securities involve the risk of loss. Past performance is no guarantee of future results.


This Blog contains links to other websites (which may include message boards or forums). We are not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such sites. Please understand that any information that is disclosed in these areas becomes public information. We have no control over its use and you should exercise caution when deciding to disclose your personal information.


Conclusion

Beheading a succulent can help rejuvenate an old plant or produce new plants from the parent. By following these steps and avoiding common mistakes, you can successfully behead your succulent and watch it thrive. Remember to choose the right succulent, gather your supplies, make a clean cut, replant the top portion in well-draining soil, and water sparingly. With patience and care, you'll soon have healthy, thriving succulents to enjoy.

Table of Contents
  1. How to Behead a Succulent: A Comprehensive Guide
    1. Step 1: Choose the Right Succulent
    2. Step 2: Gather Your Supplies
    3. Step 3: Prepare the Succulent
    4. Step 4: Make the Cut
    5. Step 5: Replant the Top Portion
    6. Step 6: Care for Your New Plants
  2. Tips for Success
  3. Common Mistakes to Avoid
  4. Propagating Succulents from Beheaded Stems
  5. Industry Opinion
  6. FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)
    1. Q: Can I behead any succulent?
    2. Q: When is the best time to behead a succulent?
    3. Q: What tools do I need to behead a succulent?
    4. Q: How do I know where to make the cut?
    5. Q: How do I make the cut?
    6. Q: Do I need to use rooting hormone when replanting the top portion?
    7. Q: How long should I let the top portion callus over before replanting?
    8. Q: What type of soil should I use to replant the top portion?
    9. Q: How much water should I give my newly replanted succulent?
    10. Q: How much sunlight does a beheaded succulent need?
    11. Q: Why is my beheaded succulent not growing new leaves?
    12. Q: Can I behead multiple stems at once?
    13. Q: How do I know if my succulent is healthy enough to behead?
    14. Q: How long does it take for a beheaded succulent to root?
    15. Q: How often should I fertilize my beheaded succulent?
    16. Q: Can I behead a succulent in the winter?
    17. Q: Can I propagate a beheaded succulent in water?
    18. Q: Can I use any type of pot or container to replant the top portion?
    19. Q: Can I behead an indoor succulent?
    20. Q: Can I behead a succulent that has a single stem?
    21. Q: How do I know if my succulent is getting too much or too little water?
    22. Q: How deep should I plant the top portion of the succulent?
    23. Q: Can I use sand instead of potting soil to replant the top portion?
    24. Q: Can I replant the top portion of the succulent in the same pot as the parent plant?
  7. Please note
  8. Conclusion

Disclosure:  Some of the links in this article may be affiliate links, which can provide compensation to me at no cost to you if you decide to purchase. This site is not intended to provide financial advice and is for entertainment only.