73 BEST Tips Bloodhound vs Coonhound (Comparison)

David R Grant Jun 21, 2023
9 People Read
Coonhound
Table of Contents
  1. Bloodhound vs Coonhound
  2. Physical Characteristics
  3. Temperament
  4. Hunting and Tracking Abilities
  5. Training and Exercise Needs
  6. Health Concerns
  7. Breed History
  8. Grooming Needs
  9. Living Arrangements
  10. Intelligence and Trainability
  11. Different Coonhound Breeds
  12. Different Bloodhound Breeds
  13. Activities and Sports
  14. Socialization and Behavioral Issues
  15. Choosing the Right Breed
  16. Adoption and Breeders
  17. Training and Socialization Tips
  18. Final Thoughts
  19. FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)
  20. Please note
  21. Conclusion

Disclosure: Some of the links in this article may be affiliate links, which can provide compensation to me at no cost to you if you decide to purchase. This site is not intended to provide financial advice and is for entertainment only. 

Bloodhound vs Coonhound

When it comes to hunting dogs, two breeds that come to mind for many people are the Bloodhound and the Coonhound.


While both breeds are known for their tracking abilities, there are some key differences between the two.


In this article, we'll take a closer look at Bloodhounds vs Coonhounds and compare them in various areas.


Physical Characteristics

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are large, muscular dogs with long ears and a keen sense of smell. Bloodhounds typically weigh between 80-110 pounds and stand around 23-27 inches tall at the shoulder. They have droopy jowls and a wrinkled forehead.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, come in a variety of sizes depending on the breed. For example, the Black and Tan Coonhound can weigh up to 100 pounds and stand up to 27 inches tall at the shoulder, while the Treeing Walker Coonhound is slightly smaller, weighing up to 70 pounds and standing around 22-27 inches tall.


Temperament

Bloodhounds are known for their gentle and affectionate nature. They are usually good with children and other pets, and they enjoy being around people. However, they can be stubborn and independent at times, which can make them difficult to train.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, are more energetic and outgoing. They love to play and are often used as family pets because of their friendly and loyal nature.


Hunting and Tracking Abilities

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are hunting dogs, but they have different specialties. Bloodhounds are known for their ability to track scents over long distances. They have the best sense of smell of any dog breed, and they are often used for search and rescue missions.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, are bred specifically for hunting raccoons and other small game. They have a keen sense of smell as well, but they are also skilled at treeing, which means they chase the prey up into a tree and bark to alert the hunter.


Training and Exercise Needs

Because Bloodhounds can be stubborn and independent, they require patient and consistent training. They are also prone to obesity, so regular exercise is important to keep them healthy.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, are more energetic and enjoy playing and running outside. They require regular exercise to keep them physically and mentally stimulated. Both breeds benefit from early socialization and obedience training.


Health Concerns

Like all breeds, both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are prone to certain health issues. Bloodhounds are susceptible to hip dysplasia, bloat, and ear infections due to their long ears. Coonhounds can be prone to hip dysplasia, ear infections, and eye issues such as cataracts and cherry eye. Regular veterinary check-ups and preventative care can help keep both breeds healthy.


Breed History

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds have a long history dating back several centuries. Bloodhounds were originally bred in Belgium and were used for tracking game. They were later brought to England where they were used for tracking poachers and runaway slaves.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, have a more American history. They were bred in the southern United States as hunting dogs, specifically for hunting raccoons and other small game.


Grooming Needs

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds have short, dense coats that require minimal grooming. However, Bloodhounds are known for their droopy ears, which can be prone to infections if not kept clean.


Coonhounds can also be prone to ear infections due to their long ears. Regular cleaning and inspection of the ears is important for both breeds. Additionally, both breeds may drool and require occasional wiping of the face.


Living Arrangements

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are large breeds that require space to move around. While they can adapt to living in an apartment with regular exercise, they are best suited for homes with a yard or outdoor space. They also thrive in homes with active owners who can provide plenty of exercise and daily walks.


Intelligence and Trainability

While both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are intelligent breeds, they have different personalities when it comes to training. Bloodhounds are known for their stubbornness and independence, which can make them difficult to train.


They require a patient and consistent trainer who can use positive reinforcement techniques. Coonhounds, on the other hand, are more outgoing and eager to please. They respond well to training and enjoy learning new things.


Different Coonhound Breeds

There are several different breeds of Coonhounds, each with their own unique characteristics.


In addition to the Black and Tan Coonhound and the Treeing Walker Coonhound mentioned earlier, there is also the English Coonhound, which is a rare breed that is known for its loyalty and hunting abilities.


The Redbone Coonhound is another popular breed that is known for its speed and agility.


Different Bloodhound Breeds

Similarly, there are several different breeds of Bloodhounds as well. The American Bloodhound is the most common breed in the United States and is known for its tracking abilities and friendly nature.


The Southern Hound, also known as the Carolina Hound, is a rare breed that is believed to be an ancestor of the Bloodhound. They are used for hunting and have a strong sense of smell.


Activities and Sports

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds can participate in various sports and activities. Bloodhounds are known to excel in scent work, tracking, and obedience competitions. They also enjoy hiking and other outdoor activities with their owners.


Coonhounds, on the other hand, are often used for hunting competitions, specifically for treeing and trailing events. They can also participate in agility competitions and other outdoor activities.


Socialization and Behavioral Issues

As with all dog breeds, socialization is important for both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds. Early exposure to new people, animals, and environments can help prevent behavioral issues such as aggression and fearfulness.


Coonhounds can be prone to separation anxiety if left alone for long periods of time, while Bloodhounds may become destructive if not given enough exercise and mental stimulation.


Choosing the Right Breed

When considering whether a Bloodhound or a Coonhound is the right breed for you, there are several factors to consider.


First, think about your lifestyle and activity level. Both breeds require regular exercise, but Coonhounds may be better suited for those who enjoy more outdoor activities such as hiking and hunting. Second, consider your living arrangements.


Both breeds require space to move around, so living in an apartment may not be ideal. Finally, consider your experience with dog training. Bloodhounds can be more challenging to train, while Coonhounds tend to be more eager to please.


In conclusion, Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are both unique and beloved breeds with distinct differences in personality, physical characteristics, and hunting abilities. While both breeds require regular exercise and care, they have different needs that should be carefully considered before choosing a new furry companion.


With proper training, socialization, and care, Bloodhounds and Coonhounds can make loyal and loving pets for those who appreciate their unique qualities.


Adoption and Breeders

When looking to adopt a Bloodhound or Coonhound, it's important to do your research and find a reputable breeder or rescue organization.


Both breeds can be prone to certain health issues, so it's important to ensure that the breeder or rescue organization has taken steps to screen for these issues.


Additionally, it's important to meet with the breeder or rescue organization and spend time with the dog before making a decision.


If you're interested in adopting a Bloodhound or Coonhound, there are several rescue organizations and breed-specific rescues that can help connect you with adoptable dogs.


Additionally, there are many reputable breeders of both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds that can provide information on the breed and help you find the right dog for your needs.


Training and Socialization Tips

Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds require early socialization and training to ensure they grow up to be well-behaved and obedient. Here are some tips for training and socializing your new furry companion:


1. Start training early: Begin training your dog as soon as possible, using positive reinforcement techniques like treats and praise.


2. Use consistency: Be consistent in your training methods and expectations, and use the same commands every time.


3. Provide plenty of exercise: Both Bloodhounds and Coonhounds require regular exercise to keep them healthy and happy. Provide daily walks, playtime, and outdoor activities.


4. Socialize frequently: Expose your dog to new people, animals, and environments frequently to prevent behavioral issues.


5. Use positive reinforcement: Reward good behavior with treats and praise to encourage obedience and good behavior.


Final Thoughts

In conclusion, Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are two beloved hunting dog breeds with unique characteristics and personalities. While they may have some similarities in physical appearance, their hunting abilities, temperament, and training needs differ significantly.


Both breeds make excellent pets for those who appreciate their unique qualities and are willing to provide them with the care and attention they need.


Whether you choose a Bloodhound or a Coonhound, be sure to do your research and find a reputable breeder or rescue organization to ensure a healthy and happy life for your furry companion.


FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)


1. What is the difference between a Bloodhound and a Coonhound?

Bloodhounds are bred for scent tracking over long distances, while Coonhounds are bred for hunting small game.


2. Which breed is more affectionate, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Bloodhounds are generally more affectionate and enjoy being around people.


3. Do Bloodhounds or Coonhounds make better family pets?

Both breeds can make good family pets, but it depends on individual preferences and lifestyle.


4. Are Bloodhounds or Coonhounds easier to train?

Coonhounds are generally easier to train than Bloodhounds.


5. Which breed requires more exercise, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds require regular exercise, but Coonhounds may require more due to their energetic nature.


6. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds live in apartments?

Both breeds can adapt to apartment living with regular exercise, but they are best suited for homes with outdoor space.


7. How much do Bloodhounds and Coonhounds typically weigh?

Bloodhounds typically weigh between 80-110 pounds, while Coonhounds can weigh anywhere from 40-100 pounds depending on the breed.


8. Which breed is more prone to health issues, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds can be prone to certain health issues, but Bloodhounds may be more susceptible to obesity and ear infections due to their droopy ears.


9. Are Bloodhounds or Coonhounds better for hunting?

Both breeds are excellent hunting dogs, but Bloodhounds are better suited for tracking scents over long distances, while Coonhounds are specifically bred for hunting small game.


10. Which breed is better with children, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds can be good with children, but it depends on individual personality and training.


11. Do Bloodhounds or Coonhounds shed a lot?

Both breeds have short, dense coats that require minimal grooming, but they may shed seasonally.


12. Can Bloodhounds or Coonhounds be trained for obedience competitions?

Both breeds can be trained for obedience competitions, but Bloodhounds may be more challenging due to their stubborn nature.


13. Which breed is better for search and rescue missions, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Bloodhounds are known for their incredible sense of smell and are often used for search and rescue missions.


14. Are Bloodhounds or Coonhounds more independent?

Bloodhounds are generally more independent and can be stubborn at times.


15. Which breed is more outgoing, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Coonhounds are generally more outgoing and energetic than Bloodhounds.


16. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be trained to get along with other pets?

Both breeds can be trained to get along with other pets with proper socialization and training.


17. How often should Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be groomed?

Both breeds have short, dense coats that require minimal grooming, but their ears should be cleaned regularly to prevent infections.


18. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be left alone for long periods of time?

Both breeds can become anxious and destructive if left alone for long periods of time, so it's important to provide plenty of exercise and mental stimulation.


19. Do Bloodhounds or Coonhounds bark a lot?

Coonhounds are known for their barking and howling, while Bloodhounds tend to be more quiet.


20. Which breed is more loyal, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds are known for their loyalty and affection towards their owners.


21. How long do Bloodhounds and Coonhounds typically live?

Both breeds typically live between 10-12 years.


22. Are Bloodhounds and Coonhounds good with strangers?

Both breeds can be good with strangers with proper socialization and training.


23. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be trained for agility competitions?

Both breeds can be trained for agility competitions, but Coonhounds may be more agile due to their energetic nature.


24. Which breed is better for hiking, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds can be good for hiking, but it depends on individual personality and training.


25. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be trained for hunting competitions?

Both breeds can be trained for hunting competitions, but Coonhounds are specifically bred for this purpose.


26. Which breed is better for families with children, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Both breeds can be good with children, but it's important to choose a dog with a compatible temperament.


27. Are Bloodhounds and Coonhounds easy to train for housebreaking?

Both breeds can be trained for housebreaking, but it may take time and patience.


28. Which breed is more prone to separation anxiety, Bloodhounds or Coonhounds?

Coonhounds are more prone to separation anxiety if left alone for long periods of time.


29. Can Bloodhounds and Coonhounds be trained for therapy work?

Both breeds can be trained for therapy work, but Bloodhounds may be better suited due to their calm and patient nature.


30. Are Bloodhounds and Coonhounds good watchdogs?

Coonhounds are known for being good watchdogs due to their protective nature, while Bloodhounds may be more laid-back and less likely to bark excessively.


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Conclusion

In conclusion, Bloodhounds and Coonhounds are both excellent hunting dogs with unique characteristics. Bloodhounds are gentle and affectionate, with an incredible sense of smell that makes them ideal for search and rescue missions. Coonhounds are outgoing and friendly, with a talent for treeing and hunting small game. Both breeds require regular exercise and training, and they can be prone to certain health issues. Ultimately, the best choice between the two breeds depends on individual needs and preferences.


In summary, while Bloodhounds and Coonhounds have some similarities in their physical appearance and hunting abilities, they have distinct differences in their personalities, training needs, and breed histories. Ultimately, the choice between the two breeds depends on individual preferences and lifestyle. Both breeds make excellent hunting companions and loyal family pets with proper care and attention.


Table of Contents
  1. Bloodhound vs Coonhound
  2. Physical Characteristics
  3. Temperament
  4. Hunting and Tracking Abilities
  5. Training and Exercise Needs
  6. Health Concerns
  7. Breed History
  8. Grooming Needs
  9. Living Arrangements
  10. Intelligence and Trainability
  11. Different Coonhound Breeds
  12. Different Bloodhound Breeds
  13. Activities and Sports
  14. Socialization and Behavioral Issues
  15. Choosing the Right Breed
  16. Adoption and Breeders
  17. Training and Socialization Tips
  18. Final Thoughts
  19. FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)
  20. Please note
  21. Conclusion

Disclosure:  Some of the links in this article may be affiliate links, which can provide compensation to me at no cost to you if you decide to purchase. This site is not intended to provide financial advice and is for entertainment only.